American English (Northern California)

"See above those clouds, near where the blue sky appears to fold? Some say it is the entrance to the floating isles where pirates still rule the air and dragons choose to live. Only the most skilled pilots can sail their craft close enough to even glimpse the light coming from within. You can’t find those who know the way; they find you. Rather, you four lazy tourists must learn from your books and be ready, so that you may not miss an opportunity to travel to that mysterious place. It would be an adventure that you would never forget. Now, I think that’s enough with this pleasurable story telling. Go home and join your aunt - she’s cooking fine food!”

frezned:

See above those clouds, near where the blue sky appears to fold? Some say it is the entrance to the floating isles where pirates still rule the air and dragons choose to live. Only the most skilled pilots can sail their craft close enough to even glimpse the light coming from within. You can’t find those who know the way; they find you. Rather, you four lazy tourists must learn from your books and be ready, so that you may not miss an opportunity to travel to that mysterious place. It would be an adventure that you would never forget. Now, I think that’s enough with this pleasurable story telling. Go home and join your aunt - she’s cooking fine food!

itsvondell:

coryldork:

itsvondell:

i like the Th symbol. imagine pitching the idea of the & symbol today. people on tumblr would make so much fun of you

I think its design is odd (for the Th symbol). I’ve experimented writing with it, and it just doesn’t flow nicely. The ampersand has some variations to it, like the little + sign, and then the variations with the 3 and little lines.

But the Th symbol just… it’s weird to me, because it’s a combination of a capital “T” and a lowercase “h”. It’s not really a symbol in the sense that the ampersand is a symbol. It’s a combination of two letters and it’s odd. 

Its intent is good, no doubt, but in comparison, think of how often the ampersand is used. Most often, it’s used for aesthetics, especially in titles. You don’t see people writing to each other & writing their sentences like this. If they do, they’d be mocked for it because it isn’t seen as proper grammar. 

I dunno. I don’t think it’ll become a widely accepted symbol. It needs some refinement and a way to stand out, because putting the curve of “h” onto a “T” just doesn’t work for me. It’s too much like “Th”—just one letter away from “The”—and comes off as being lazy instead of innovative.

i hate to be the bearer of bad news here but the ampersand is a joined ligature of the word “et” (‘and’ in Latin’) and began in a very similar fashion

image

image

The word “ampersand” is also a contraction of the phrase “and, per se, ‘and’”. It used to be included at the end of the alphabet as the 27th letter, with the pronunciation ‘and’.

Tu me manques

syntactician:

I asked about the construction ‘tu me manque’ (‘I miss you’) and got some speedy and helpful answers.

I was confused because it looks like it means ‘You miss me’. I was thinking of when I learnt French at school, and I thought we learnt that to say ‘I need an X’ we should say ‘Je manque un X’, meaning something like ‘I lack an X’. It turns out that this is basically right, although there should be a ‘de’ in there too. This is the construction with ‘de’ + a direct object, and it means ‘to lack something’. 

But there is also this other construction, used when you mean ‘to miss a person or place or thing’, in which the subject is the missed thing, and the person feeling the lack is the indirect object. ‘Me’ in ‘tu me manques’ is dative (= ‘to/from me’), not accusative (=’me’), and it means ‘you are missing from me’, as the gazillions of tumblr-language-romantics have pointed out. 

It’s similar, I think, to the construction ‘me gusta X’ in Spanish, which means something like ‘X is pleasing to me’. 

Never thought about these constructions in terms of datives before but now it makes so much sense.

draumar:

linguists are cute.

The Linguists - We are the World

Budapest ELTE-MTA Theoretical Linguistics Programme


“We are the world,
We are the linguists,
We are the ones who make a brighter day 
By making theories.
There’s a choice we’re making
By forming hypotheses 
And we’ll describe a language 
Just you and me.”

I’m in love

thedailywhat:

Best Word Ever of the Day: After overhearing nearby diners discuss the worst words ever (moist, etc.), blogger Ted McCagg was inspired to hold a March Madness-style contest to find The Best Word Ever — and diphthong ended up the champ. To which we say: Diphthong? Really? Hornswoggle should have won, hands-down.
[kottke]

thedailywhat:

Best Word Ever of the Day: After overhearing nearby diners discuss the worst words ever (moist, etc.), blogger Ted McCagg was inspired to hold a March Madness-style contest to find The Best Word Ever — and diphthong ended up the champ. 

To which we say: Diphthong? Really? Hornswoggle should have won, hands-down.

[kottke]

superlinguo:

This is a wug.
And if there were two, there would be two ______
If you said wugs with the s sounding like /z/ rather than /s/ then congratulations! You have productive morphological capabilities. That is, when faced with a word you’ve never seen before, you were able to use your knowledge of how English works to figure out that -s is plural, and it’s voiced (z instead of s) after voiced consonants (such as g).
It’s not remarkable that an adult native speaker can do this, but when Jean Berko Gleason invented the wug for a test in 1958, she demonstrated that children can also do such things, and at a much younger age than was previously assumed.
Berko Gleason’s work is admired for its elegance and importance to the field, but many linguists are also fond of these little critters that she created. They’ve become something of a mascot for linguists, some get wug tattoos, and they appear on the International Linguistics Olympiad page.
They never fail to amuse me.
[Image is from McMaster Linguistics - a cached Geocities blog (how retro) but it’s originally from one of Berko Gleason’s papers]

superlinguo:

This is a wug.

And if there were two, there would be two ______

If you said wugs with the s sounding like /z/ rather than /s/ then congratulations! You have productive morphological capabilities. That is, when faced with a word you’ve never seen before, you were able to use your knowledge of how English works to figure out that -s is plural, and it’s voiced (z instead of s) after voiced consonants (such as g).

It’s not remarkable that an adult native speaker can do this, but when Jean Berko Gleason invented the wug for a test in 1958, she demonstrated that children can also do such things, and at a much younger age than was previously assumed.

Berko Gleason’s work is admired for its elegance and importance to the field, but many linguists are also fond of these little critters that she created. They’ve become something of a mascot for linguists, some get wug tattoos, and they appear on the International Linguistics Olympiad page.

They never fail to amuse me.

[Image is from McMaster Linguistics - a cached Geocities blog (how retro) but it’s originally from one of Berko Gleason’s papers]

Sometimes I get emotional over theta roles

But then I remember I’m the only one who knows what a theta role is

youngstero:

as a jew I can tell you that hebrew is not a real language

we made it up

just random sounds

Haha the best about this is that Hebrew really isn’t a ‘real’ language as it is spoken today because it had been completely out of use for so long that when it was revived a lot of its grammar and vocabulary had to be reconstructed from other sources.

superlinguo:

Today is the first day of the Melbourne International Comedy Festival - when funny people take over our fair town for four weeks. To celebrate we thought we’d share this excellent video from Mr Simon Taylor, who gives us his musings on why he likes language.

vowelsme:

[via]

everydayanthro:

Brice Russ / Ohio State University
BRICE RUSS / OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY
Brice Russ maps out how people refer to carbonated beverages. Yellow dots indicate “pop,” red dots “Coke,” and blue dots “soda.”

Sneakers or tennis shoes? Hoagie or hero? Dust bunny or house moss? These differences in regional speech are thriving in an unlikely place — Twitter.

study presented by Brice Russ, a graduate student at Ohio State University, at the American Dialect Society’s annual meeting in January demonstrates how Twitter can be used as a valuable and abundant source for linguistic research. With more than 200 million posts each day, the site has allowed researchers to predict moods, study the Arab Spring and now, map out regional dialects.

According to the New York Times, Russ waded through nearly 400,000 Twitter posts to analyze three different linguistic variables. He started by mapping the regional distribution of “Coke,” “pop” and “soda” based on 2,952 tweets from 1,118 identifiable locations. As has been documented in the past, “Coke” predominantly came from Southern tweets, “pop” from the Midwest and Pacific Northwest and “soda” from the Northeast and Southwest.

Russ then analyzed  the migration of “hella,” meaning “very” as in “hella cool,” the Times notes. The qualifier first sprouted in California, but to Russ’ surprise, has since made its way to the Midwest. He also took a look at a common Midwest and Pittsburgh-area syntactical construction, “needs X-ed” as in “the sink needs fixed.” This phrase seems to have moved toward the South since the mid-1990s.

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